Sophie Tafreshi: Young, Enthusiastic, and Unstoppable

December 23rd, 2010 by lbw

Scientologist and fashion show production manager Sophie Tafreshi has what it takes to succeed.  Her profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos available on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

Scientologist Sophie Tafreshi knows what she wants, and she is well on her way to getting it.  She is launching herself on a new career.

This is her first season as manager of a production company that puts on runway shows all over the country. She hires the models, works with the producer and makes sure all the thousands of tasks get done that result in a smooth-running professional production.

Tafreshi, 23, is also an equestrian and competitive show jumper, which she describes in a video at www.Scientology.org.

“There’s tons of nerves and pressure in this sport,” she says. “These are 2,000-pound animals you’re riding and they have minds of their own. Having the skills I’ve learned in Scientology makes it so much easier to stay focused and have a quick reaction time.  It has definitely given me the ability to be calm, which is huge in my sport, because the horses feel every emotion that’s going through your body.”

Tafreshi is just as excited and focused on her new career. While working in the fashion industry, she is also pursuing a business degree through online college courses. She finds this the perfect fit with her frequent travel for fashion shows and allows her to balance work and study.

“I went to school at the Delphi Academy which uses Study Technology developed by L. Ron Hubbard,” she says.  “One of the most important principles I learned there is the importance of doing something with your education.”

While still in high school, Tafreshi did an internship under the supervision of a fellow equestrian who also works in the fashion industry. Tafreshi showed such promise her colleague encouraged her to contact her if she ever wanted a job, and that’s where she is working today.

“I find being an equestrian and working in the fashion industry have a lot in common,” says Tafreshi.  “They are both very competitive. They are nerve wracking, exhilarating and always a thrill.”

Raised with Scientology principles, Tafreshi uses what she has learned of her religion to stay calm and not get rattled—vital abilities in both fields.

“You can run into some amazing tempers and egos in this industry,” she says. “I don’t know how I would cope if I didn’t have the understanding of human nature and communication skills I learned in Scientology.”

Tafreshi is optimistic and certain about her future.

“What I’ve gained from Scientology is a burning desire to do well in life.  I know who I am and I know what I want.  I also know that no matter what, I can win in life. And that’s exactly what I intend to do.”

View the Sophie Tafreshi video at Scientology.org.

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The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Photographer Craig Norris’s Life is the Picture of Success

December 23rd, 2010 by lbw

Scientology helped Hong Kong-based Australian photographer Craig Norris gain true spiritual wealth—a fulfilling career, ideal marriage, and personal happiness. His profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos available on the Scientology website at

Capitalizing on a flair for the aesthetic, a keen business sense, and advanced technical skills, when disaster struck, Australian Scientologist Craig Norris reinvented himself.

Arriving in Hong Kong in 1993, for a decade Norris designed the technical production infrastructure for TV stations, first at the Asian headquarters of a Japanese company and later as an independent contractor. But in 2003, the SARS epidemic (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) created a panic that crashed the local economy and left Norris without a job.

“Many expatriate positions were cancelled as a result of SARS, including mine,” says Norris.  “My career in the Hong Kong television industry came to an abrupt end.”

But while friends packed to fly home, Norris chose to stay, creating a new career for himself as a photographer. Using communication, time management and organizational skills learned through Scientology, Norris was able to do so with ease.

“Modern photography has quite a strong technical element due to the use of digital cameras and computers, so with a good background in digital technology from my work in television production, I was able to hit the ground running,” he says.

Successful in his new career, the crowning element in his happiness was his 2005 marriage to Janet Tsui. Scientology principles have been invaluable to them in creating their relationship.

“Janet is the love of my life,” says Norris, 54. “Her beauty, both physical and spiritual, is my inspiration. Fundamental Scientology concepts about communication and respect have helped us build a solid foundation.”

Norris credits his understanding of administrative technology developed by L. Ron Hubbard for the smooth transition to his new career—a thriving, multi-faceted business including a studio, photography workshops and consulting.

“Scientology taught me that success is all about contributing value to the community and the world at large, and finding ways to increase the value and quantity of one’s production,” he says.

Norris first learned about Dianetics and Scientology when he read Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health in 1978.  Fascinated, he then took courses at the Church of Scientology in his native Sydney.

“I had wondered since I was a kid about the big questions like ‘Who am I really?’ and ‘What happens after we die?’ I found the answers to those questions and more in Scientology,” Norris says. “Material wealth is transient and does not guarantee happiness or loving companionship.  Through Scientology I have gained real spiritual wealth and a peace of mind I can only describe as priceless.”

View the Craig Norris video at www.Scientology.org.

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The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Church of Scientology of Amsterdam Sponsors Anti-Discrimination March on Human Rights Day

December 21st, 2010 by lbw

Volunteers from the Church of Scientology of Amsterdam on a march in commemoration of the anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on December 10.  >>

Monrovia man runs 3,500 miles across America

December 21st, 2010 by lbw

Ultramarathoner John Radich, 56, who recently returned from a four-month 20-day run across America for The Way to Happiness Foundation Running for Youth, poses Tuesday, December 14, 2010 along Route 66 in Monrovia. Radich, who dreamed of running across the states since he was 16, ran from Santa Monica to Atlantic City on Route 66 and the Old Lincoln Highway.
Read more:

http://www.pasadenastarnews.com/news/ci_16858387#ixzz18oasCY2o

Scientology Media Advisory: The Scientology Religion and the Holiday Season

December 13th, 2010 by lbw

At this time of year, media often ask how Scientologists observe the holiday season. To answer that question, the Church of Scientology International provides the following:

How do Scientologists celebrate the holiday season?

Observances of the holidays are as diverse as Scientologists are.

Because the Scientology religion is practiced in 165 countries and territories, Scientologists come from a wide variety of faiths and cultural traditions.

But no matter what their background, they, like most people, gather with loved ones to enjoy the warmth of friends and family and celebrate the joy of the season.

Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard honored the great religious leaders of the past for the wisdom they brought to the world, writing that Scientology shares “the goals set for Man by Christ, which are wisdom, good health and  immortality.” It is in this spirit that Scientologists celebrate the holiday season, whether Christmas, Hanukah, Kwanzaa or any other religious or cultural tradition.

Scientologists live by a code which includes: “To use the best I know of Scientology to the best of my ability to help my family, friends, groups and the world.” During the holiday season, Scientologists are especially active in this respect, volunteering in a wide range of endeavors to improve the lives of individuals and the community and bring joy to those who may need assistance.

What do Churches of Scientology do during the holiday season?

In addition to regular Scientology religious services, Churches of Scientology provide many special holiday activities for Scientologists and open houses and tours for members of the community.

Scientology Churches and their parishioners also organize and support numerous charitable events during the holidays, such as toy drives, food and clothing collections, and parties for underprivileged children. Scientologists visit nursing homes, orphanages, hospitals and homeless shelters, bringing holiday cheer through gifts and entertainment.

Christmas Stories

The Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre International in Hollywood produces  Christmas Stories, an annual holiday benefit performance presented in the style of a 1930s radio show with traditional and original stories, songs and skits. (http://www.scientology.cc) This year’s cast included Anne Archer, Jennifer Aspen, Eric Balfour, Erika Christensen, Jason Dohring, Jenna Elfman, Juliette Lewis, Marisol Nichols and Ethan Suplee.

For nearly two decades, proceeds have benefited the Hollywood Police Activities League’s annual Christmas party for underprivileged children and PAL’s year-round inner city programs for at-risk youth.

Winter Wonderland

In an annual tradition beginning in 1983 when Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard provided a 60-foot Christmas tree as a gift to the people of Hollywood, Winter Wonderland holiday village is erected each year on Hollywood Boulevard as a service to the community. The opening of the village on the Sunday after Thanksgiving signals the start of the holiday season, when Santa arrives in his sleigh—always the final float in the famed Hollywood Christmas Parade—and lights the tree and village. Made possible by the Friends of L. Ron Hubbard Foundation, Winter Wonderland, attracts more than 40,000 Los Angeles residents and tourists to daily live performances by community vocal and instrumental groups and snow banks imported for the season.

Winter Wonderland is also presented for three weeks each December in Clearwater, Florida, as a service to the community and to benefit needy children. The Church of Scientology and parishioners organize and sponsor the Christmas village, with ten of thousands of residents and tourists enjoying Santa, Mrs. Claus’s cookie decorating kitchen, live entertainment by local school, church and professional performing groups, a petting zoo and pony rides.  (http://www.clearwatercommunityvolunteers.org/winterwonderland.html)

Scientology Churches call for end to discrimination on Human Rights Day

December 10th, 2010 by lbw

Youth in 40 Nations Speak Up for Human Rights

 

Thousands of youth in more than 40 nations, representing Scientology Churches and Youth for Human Rights International chapters, organized and participated in Human Rights Walks, educational forums and interactive seminars December 10 in observance of the 62nd anniversary of ratification of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Centered on “Speak Up, Stop Discrimination” which is this year’s United Nations theme for Human Rights Day, events ran the gamut from a forum on human trafficking in Pasadena, California, to Walks for Human Rights in over 30 countries to seminars on basic human rights in Pakistan.

Those walking for human rights handed out thousands of Youth for Human Rights booklets that present the 30 articles of the Universal Declaration in words anyone can understand.

“When young people hear about hate crimes and discrimination happening in their areas, they want to take action and speak out,” says Tracie Morrow, Human Rights Youth Coordinator for the Church of Scientology International. “How can they be silent when they witness bullying in their own school or read about an imam attacked in New York solely because of his religion or an Ecuadorian immigrant murdered by a mob in a heinous hate crime?”

Morrow pointed to the State of Chiapas in Mexico as an example of what can be accomplished. When a national survey by the Secretary of Education of Mexico found that 50 percent of high school students in Chiapas admitted to discriminating against others in school, the government decided to take effective action on the issue and with information provided by Youth for Human Rights of Mexico, ratified a change to their constitution to include the full 30 articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and make human rights education in school mandatory.
“The first Mexican state to take this step, Chiapas is setting an example for Mexico and the rest of the world,” says Morrow.

The Mexico Ministry of Education followed the Chiapas lead and printed 10,000 copies of YHRI’s booklet What are Human Rights? to mark Human Rights Day.

International Human Rights Day events by Churches of Scientology and Youth for Human Rights were held on six continents, in Austria, Australia, Belgium, Cameroon, Canada, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Pakistan, Panama, Russia, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Taiwan, Ukraine, UK, USA and Zambia.

The Human Rights Department of the Church of Scientology is a proud supporter of Youth for Human Rights International, a secular nonprofit organization founded in 2001. YHRI’s purpose is to teach young people about human rights, specifically the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, so they become advocates for peace and tolerance.

Winter Wonderland

December 9th, 2010 by lbw


CLEARWATER – The Church of Scientology’s Clearwater Community Volunteers present the 18th annual Winter Wonderland through Dec. 22 in downtown Clearwater at the intersection of Drew Street and Fort Harrison Avenue. Hours are weekends, 4 to 9 p.m.; and weeknights, 6 to 9 p.m. Admission is free, but a small fee is charged for some of the activities to offset costs. This sparkling holiday winter village is complete with four Tudor style cottages, set amidst a backdrop of thousands and thousands of twinkling lights – placed just so – on 100 freshly snowed-on large pine trees. There is a playground with swings and a fort to explore. Action abounds in the two bouncy houses and giant slide filled with children. Pony rides and a petting zoo create an even more delightful experience. Entertainment will include stage performances by local entertainers, magicians, The Tricky Dog Show and the famous Winter Wonderland Express a trackless choo-choo train

Celebrities Read Christmas Stories For Charity

December 9th, 2010 by lbw

Celebrity members of the Church of Scientology Celebrity Centre presented “Christmas Stories XVIII” on December 3rd and 4th to benefit charity.

Members including Anne Archer, Jennifer Aspen, Eric Balfour, Erika Christensen, Jason Dohring, Jenna Elfman, Juliette Lewis, Marisol Nichols and Ethan Suplee performed skits and told Christmas stories to benefit the Hollywood Police Activities League’s annual Christmas party for underprivileged children, as well as their year-round inner city programs for at-risk youth.

The Christmas Stories stage is a 1930s style radio show setting with performances of traditional and original stories and songs, now in its 18th year. The annual event has raised more than $265,000 in proceeds for these community programs since it began in 1993.

The Police Activities League (PAL) is a nation wide youth development program operated by police officers who provide a positive role model for youth. The program includes educational and recreational activities for at-risk youth as an alternative to gangs.

The Hollywood PAL is staffed by full time police officers dedicated solely to the program serving Hollywood youth, providing swimming, street hockey, basketball, martial arts, soccer, computer activities, arts, crafts and educational tutoring.

Hollywood PAL’s annual Christmas party is organized together with the Hollywood Division of the L.A.P.D. and in cooperation with the principals of the local public elementary schools in and around Hollywood. Seeking out and inviting children who would otherwise have no Christmas, PAL provides meals, games and toys for each child, complete with Santa Claus to deliver them.>>


A new take on life

December 7th, 2010 by lbw

reprinted from the Times of India

I stumbled upon  Scientology quite by accident some five years ago, when I drove a relative across to their centre in the capital. While there, I took a personality test and was gently persuaded by their German mission holder, Horst Tubbesing, to enroll for a 20-hour self-study life-improvement course on ‘How to Improve Relationships’. It was reasonably priced and I thought, why not.

That chance trip changed my life; it taught me to deal positively with some unflattering truths about myself! Since then, I have walked in and out of their New Delhi Hauz Khas Enclave centre many a time — for lectures and courses and for sessions of Intro Auditing. An eternal favourite are their books on marriage, children, illnesses, conflicts, study, happiness — subjects that sway your life. Scientology’s founder, L Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) was once a prolific American sci-fi writer, and his talent for writing shines through in his books. You can scan his life works at the centre (some 5,000 writings and lectures besides) and pick up whatever you think is useful or adds to your own set of beliefs, while you keep the faith you were born in.

Up your emotional tonescale
It’s easy to see why Scientology appeals to the younger generation — and why a host of international celebrities endorse it — seeking as it does to blend eastern and western thought in the 21st century. A key concept in Scientology is the emotional and chronic tonescale of a person, and it is this that Scientology seeks to ‘up’ in you — from 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 (in grief, fear, and anger) to 3.5 and 4.0 (cheerfulness and enthusiasm), and finally on to serenity of being-ness at 40. You can take that as the equivalent of nirvana and samadhi.

Scientology is a culmination of the searches Hubbard began as a young man with a study of the Vedas, the Tao, Buddhism, and Christianity and derives its literal meaning from the Latin scio, which means knowing and the Greek logos or ’study of’.

So what is Scientology?
What is Scientology about? Is it a way of life; is it a religion? Or a study of wisdom? Its official website, scientology.org says: “Scientology is a religion in its highest meaning, as it helps bring man to total freedom and truth. The essential tenets of Scientology are: You are an immortal spiritual being. Your experience extends well beyond a single lifetime. And your capabilities are unlimited, even if not presently realised. Furthermore, man is basically good. He is seeking to survive. And his survival depends upon himself and his fellows and his attainment of brotherhood with the universe.”

The first two principles bring alive the concept of atman and karma. Scientologists are all thetans — from the Greek theta, Hubbard’s term for the spiritual being that is our basic self, and what we know as the soul or atman. Another key belief is that life is a harmonious blend of the eight dynamics in your life — the self, family unit, group, species, environment, physical universe, spirituality and infinity. Even if one is out of sync, your life can go for a toss, it believes. Experiences such as this can finally lead to a reactive mind.

The reactive mind
In 1950, Hubbard wrote Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, his landmark book presenting his discovery of the reactive mind that underlies and enslaves man. The work presented the source of nightmares, unreasonable fears, upsets and insecurity, and outlined ways to pursue the long-sought goal of ‘Clear’ — the term by Hubbard for an individual who is rid of his reactive mind. Hubbard here pooh-poohed psychiatrists and their methods of treating people with antidepressants.

Hubbard labels sufferings and painful experiences as ‘engrams’ in the reactive mind which command one to act irrationally against one’s wishes and goals. These can cloud the workings of our analytical mind, which is what ensures that we behave rationally.

In a typical Hubbard-world, people have social and antisocial tendencies, but man is inherently good and can be helped by spiritual means as precise as mathematics, ‘to see a person free of the shadows which darken his day’.


Scientology Courts The Sports World

December 6th, 2010 by lbw

Appearing today in the Wall Street Journal:

The Church of Scientology is reaching out to the sports world with a campaign of short videos of athletes professing the religious organization’s virtues. Bob Adams (pictured), a Scientologist who played tight end in the NFL mainly with the Steelers and Patriots in the 1970s, says he used to take struggling New England teammates to a Scientology center because the teachings had helped him relax. “Having a 250-pound linebacker coming at you can be a little intimidating,” he says.

Scientology’s Silent Birth: One Mother’s Story

December 1st, 2010 by lbw

An article by Mary Beth Sammons was published Dec 1st 2010 on ParentDish.com.  Excerpted here:

On Dec. 6, Ethan Bristol will celebrate his first birthday with a calm, low-key gathering of his parents, grandparents and family friends who have little ones, too.

But no matter how mellow it may be, the event, marking an important milestone for the tot and his parents, Jamie and Tom Bristol of Montrose, Calif., certainly won’t be as chatter-free as the boy’s silent birth.

Almost a year ago, Ethan entered the world two weeks late at 12:17 a.m., weighing 8 pounds, 9 ounces, through a silent birth. The practice has been making headlines recently with the birth of Benjamin Travolta on Nov. 23. Actor parents Kelly Preston and John Travolta, both Scientologists, announced that they planned to use the childbirth method practiced by the Church of Scientology.

Though not a word was uttered through the labor and delivery of Ethan, the alert and wide-eyed newborn made his debut, “looked around the room and let out a little yelp,” Jamie Bristol 31, tells ParentDish.

“It was so precious, like he was saying ‘Yay,’ ” she recalls.

Except for Ethan’s whimper, there was no chatter, no commentary, no “push, push,” urgings from Dr. Ronald Wu. There were only “looks of support” from husband, Tom, 29, a midwife and the medical team throughout the four-hour labor, Bristol says.

“I did make some noises because it is labor after all,” she says. “And, if anything would have gone wrong, I would have spoken up. But the silence let me focus, remain calm and respectful to the significance of the moment. The only time someone said something was when it was obvious that I had to move to the hospital. The idea is that no one can talk through contractions. So the midwife was very respectful about that, and then just whispered to me about us having to move.”

A lifelong Scientologist who, along with her sister, was born through a natural, silent birth, Bristol tells ParentDish she had planned to have a home birth for her first child, but, as it turned out, she had to be induced after being in pre-labor for five days (with no sleep) and her water had broken. The couple had a back-up doctor, and so Bristol, her husband and midwife moved — silently, with no words spoken — to nearby Glendale Adventist Medical Center where Ethan was born four hours later.

When she discovered she was pregnant, Bristol says, she interviewed four physicians and midwives in the Los Angeles area, explaining to all of them what she wanted.

“Hands down, all four doctors were familiar with silent births, I mean this is L.A., and all felt very comfortable doing this, same with the midwives,” she tells ParentDish.

The idea in the “no words spoken” birthing process is that “the unborn child is feeling, remembering and aware of what is happening around him,” Bristol says. “A silent birth is meant to minimize the pain and discomfort for the infant, and minimize the imprinting of stressful words spoken during the moments of birthing, words that could have an adverse effect on him in later life,” she says.

The calmness and serenity are guiding principles Bristol hopes will be mainstays in her parenting, as well.

For the first six months, the couple, who owns the graphic design firm Dentist Design, worked from home so they could be with Ethan.

“I love that we can spend so much time with him,” Bristol says. “He is so much fun to have around. I love waking up to his smiling face every day. I can’t wait for him to start talking.”>>

Students Celebrate International Day of Tolerance at Human Rights Walk

November 29th, 2010 by lbw

November 16, 2010 BOCA RATON, FL – Students and human rights advocates lined the streets around Florida Atlantic University (FAU), joining similar groups all over the world for the “International Day of Tolerance,” first declared by the member states of the United Nations in 1996.

The Boca Raton event was co-sponsored by Youth for Human Rights Florida, the Center for Holocaust and Human Rights Education of Florida Atlantic University, International Student and Scholar Services, and Be Aware, Share and Act for Peace.

Walkers carried signs proclaiming the 30 human rights defined in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  This was the first of many similar events leading up to the International Walk for Human Rights, held annually around the world on December 10.

Brazillian Drummers led the way, followed by representatives of the participating groups and many who only recently learned of the campaign.

Youth for Human Rights Florida President, 20-year-old Dustin McGahee, explained: “These events unite those around the world who speak out not only for one’s own rights, but also the rights of others.  The International Walk for Human Rights will have tens of thousands of people walking in more than 30 countries.”

State Rep. Mark Pafford of West Palm Beach urged the groups to continue their work, stressing that “raising awareness of injustices is crucial to transforming the way people think about human rights issues.”

U.S. Congressman Ted Deutch also encouraged the participants.  “We can never rest on our laurels and be satisfied that work toward equal human rights is complete,” he said.  “We must continue to preserve the rights we hold dear to our hearts and make sure that everyone strives to educate future generations.”

Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, Founder and President of Youth for Human Rights International, addressed the crowd after the walk.  Having grown up during apartheid in South Africa, Dr. Shuttleworth dedicated her life to educating youth about their inherent rights, and the importance of respecting the rights of others.   For the last 7 years she has traveled the globe presenting this message and educational materials on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

On behalf of Youth for Human Rights Florida, Dr. Shuttleworth presented awards to Dr. Rose Gatens, Director of the Holocaust and Human Rights Center, and FAU Professor Dawn Wooten.  Awards were also given to FAU students Rose Morris, Laura Facundo and Sapna Talati for their contributions to creating awareness about human rights.

Youth for Human Rights Florida is a secular non-profit organization with the mission to educate about human rights both in and out of the classroom.  The uniqueness of the program lies in its educational materials, which include a youth-oriented DVD explaining the 30 human rights, created in collaboration with the Human Rights Department of the Church of Scientology International.

To find out what are human rights go to: www.youthforhumanrights.org

Nicole Greenwood Not Your Typical Hollywood Starlet

November 24th, 2010 by lbw

 

Scientologist, actress and humanitarian worker Nicole Greenwood was among the first responders in Port-au-Prince after the Haiti earthquake in January 2010. Her profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos available on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

When NBC’s Kerry Sanders described actress Nicole Greenwood on the February 3, 2010, Today Show, it was not about her performance on the TV show “In Plain Site.”

The correspondent was referring to the compassionate young woman in the bright yellow T-shirt at the bedside of a young Haitian child in a Port-au-Prince hospital.  “In 20 minutes we watched as Nicole took a pained little girl from frowns to giggles,” Sanders said.  And to Greenwood, a Scientology Volunteer Minister, helping in Haiti is one of the most important “roles” she will ever play.

Born and raised in Vancouver, BC, and with a series of Broadway road shows to her credit, Greenwood came to Hollywood and supported herself as a nanny while breaking into the TV and film industry.

It was then that she looked into Scientology.

“I felt like I’d come home,” says Greenwood.  “It had been hard to keep my perspective.  My ‘friends’ used to tease me about my old-fashioned values. Now, here was a group that agreed about the importance of honesty and treating people fairly—they viewed life very much as I do.”

“I loved that I didn’t have to ‘believe’ anything,” she said.  “I took a course, I tried it out and it worked.  So I took another course and that worked too.  I could make up my own mind.  I saw the results with my own eyes—I couldn’t deny it was true.”

Greenwood first wore a Scientology Volunteer Minister T-shirt in September 2005.

“I was always big on helping people.  Before I became a Scientologist, I had volunteered at Ground Zero after Sept 11,” she says.  “I saw the Scientology Volunteer Ministers who were there and was impressed by how effective they were.  My mother was originally from New Orleans, so when Hurricane Katrina hit I felt I had to go.”

A Scientologist by then, she joined the Scientology Disaster Relief Team headed for the Gulf Coast.

Greenwood helped alongside hundreds of Scientology Volunteer Ministers, taking on any task that was needed.  It was there she learned the Scientology assists she later used in Haiti—techniques developed by L. Ron Hubbard that address the spiritual factors in trauma, illness and injury.

Greenwood sincerely hoped she would never see such a level of devastation again.  But it paled in comparison to what she encountered in Port-au-Prince.

Greenwood signed up for the first Scientology-chartered relief flight from Los Angeles to Haiti in January 2010, to provide support services to the hundreds of doctors, nurses, EMTs and other disaster relief specialists sent to Port-au-Prince by the Church.

“The Haitians are the most spiritual and resilient people I’ve ever met.  Despite everything they have been through they do not lose hope,” says Greenwood, who is returning to volunteer in the country for the third time this year.

Greenwood learned a valuable lesson in New Orleans and Haiti.

“I realized that the Volunteer Ministers motto is true,” she says.  “No matter how tragic the circumstances ‘Something can be done about it’.”

View the Nicole Greenwood video at www.Scientology.org.

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The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Did Kelly Preston Deliver Her Baby Via Silent Birth?

November 24th, 2010 by lbw

by the editors at ParentDish
Nov 24th 2010 9:39AM

Before Kelly Preston and John Travolta welcomed their baby boy Benjamin yesterday, rumors were swirling that the 48-year-old actress was planning a silent birth in keeping with the Church of Scientology’s guidelines. What is a silent birth, exactly?

We didn’t know either, so we’re posting the Church of Scientology International’s media advisory on the meaning of “quiet” and “silent” births. What do you think? Would you have a silent birth?

WHAT IS SILENT BIRTH?
Silent birth is all about providing the best possible environment for the birthing mother and her new baby. Its origins can be found in L. Ron Hubbard’s Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health and are firmly rooted in a fundamental and abiding principle that women, particularly expectant mothers, be given the utmost in care and respect.

A silent birth is labor and delivery done in a calm and loving environment and with no spoken words by anyone attending. Chatty doctors and nurses, shouts to “PUSH, PUSH” and loud or laughing remarks to “encourage” are the types of things that are meant to be avoided.

As L. Ron Hubbard wrote: “Everyone must learn to say nothing within the expectant mother’s hearing during labor and delivery. Particularly during birth, absolute silence must be maintained and the more gentle the delivery, the better.”

The point of silent birth is NO WORDS. It does not mean a mother cannot make any sound during childbirth. It is doubtful that any woman could give birth without making any noise at all.

Mothers naturally want to give their baby the best start in life and thus keep the birth as quiet and peaceful as possible. That being said, a woman’s choice for her delivery is completely up to her and her doctor. There is no requirement to adhere to any specific routine. Just like care is taken in all other aspects of labor and birth, a woman and her doctor or midwife and any others present work out how to communicate without words.

Doctors respect the right of a mother to choose her birthing experience. Silent birth is not a medical model but a religious and philosophical approach based on L. Ron Hubbard’s research into the mind and spirit.

The principle behind not speaking during childbirth is delineated in Dianetics and to fully understand why, one should read the book Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health. But to provide a brief explanation, L. Ron Hubbard discovered the hidden source of nightmares, unreasonable fears, upsets, insecurity and psychosomatic illness-the reactive mind. This part of the mind records all perceptions during times of pain and unconsciousness-which childbirth is for both mother and child. And words, in particular, spoken during these moments, can have an adverse effect on one later in life.

However, since the research, findings and practice of silent birth were first announced by Mr. Hubbard in the 1951 text entitled Child Dianetics, this method has been corroborated and applied by doctors, nurses and midwives world over.

The Church has no policy against the use of medicines to help a person with a physical situation and these principles do not preclude a mother from receiving any medical procedure needed to safely deliver the baby, including Caesarean section. These are medical decisions and these, too, are between the mother and her doctor.

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

HOW DOES THIS ACTUALLY WORK?
There is no specific routine. Just like care is taken in all other aspects of labor and birth, a woman and her doctor or midwife and others present work out how to communicate without words. Different women have done different things.

IS IT A CHURCH RULE THAT THEIR MEMBERS MUST ADHERE TO THIS PRACTICE?
Not at all. A woman’s delivery is always up to her and her doctor.

DOES THE CHURCH HAVE RULES AGAINST PAINKILLERS, ANESTHESIA OR OTHER MEDICAL DRUGS?
The Church has no policy against the use of medicines to help a person with a physical situation. This is a matter between the person and their doctor.

DOESN’T L. RON HUBBARD RECOMMEND/ADVOCATE A NATURAL, DRUG-FREE BIRTH?
Yes, because it is best for the mother and the child. It is common knowledge that natural childbirth is best, but that doesn’t always work out, and it is up to the mother and her doctor.

IT HAS BEEN REPORTED THAT MANY SCIENTOLOGISTS WILL DEMAND A NATURAL CHILDBIRTH WITH NO DRUGS. WHY?
It is the mother’s choice. If they don’t use drugs it’s simply because a mother wants the best for her new baby.

IS IT TRUE THAT SCIENTOLOGISTS CAN’T TOUCH OR TALK TO THEIR BABY FOR THREE DAYS TO A WEEK? OR ARE THERE SEVEN DAYS OF SILENCE AFTER BIRTH?
Absolutely not, this is a complete fabrication and not a practice of Scientology.

DO DOCTORS AGREE WITH THESE PROCEDURES?
Of course. It’s a personal decision of the mother and doesn’t interfere with any medical procedure. Doctors naturally respect the right of a mother to choose her own birth experience.

ARE C-SECTIONS PERMITTED?
This is a medical decision, nothing to do with Scientology.

CAN YOU EXPLAIN FURTHER WHAT DIANETICS IS?
L. Ron Hubbard discovered the single source of stress, worry, self-doubt and psychosomatic illness, which is the reactive mind. This part of the mind records all perceptions in times of pain and unconsciousness and in particular, words spoken during these moments can have adverse effects on people later in life.

Full information on this is available in the book, Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

WHAT DOES SCIENTOLOGY SAY ABOUT THE RAISING OF CHILDREN?
L. Ron Hubbard has written a great deal about raising children. In Scientology, children are respected the way any person should be albeit in a young body. This does not make them any less a person and they should be given all the love and respect granted adults. Scientologists also believe children should be encouraged to contribute to family life and not just be “seen and not heard,” as the old saying goes.

Most children raised in Scientology homes are above average in ability and quickly begin to understand how and why people act as they do. Life thus becomes a lot happier and safer for them.

WHAT ELSE HAS L. RON HUBBARD WRITTEN ABOUT RAISING CHILDREN?
There is a lot written in Scientology about children. Scientology help people understand their basic nature and this alone helps parents tremendously.

Some of the basic principles Scientologists apply to parenting are summed up in the following quotes:
“Today’s children will become tomorrow’s civilization. Try to be the child’s friend. It is certainly true that a child needs friends. Try to find out what a child’s problem really is and without crushing their own solutions, try to help solve them. A child factually does not do well without love. Most children have an abundance of it to return.” - “The Way to Happiness”

“The spoiled child is the child whose decisions have been interrupted continuously and who is robbed of his independence.” - “Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health”

“Affection could no more spoil a child than the sun could be put out by a bucket of gasoline.” - “Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health”

“A good, stable adult with love and tolerance in his heart is about the best therapy a child can have.” - “Child Dianetics”

“A human being feels able and competent only so long as he is permitted to contribute as much or more than he has contributed to him.” “Child Dianetics”

DO SCIENTOLOGISTS CONSIDER CHILDREN ADULTS IN A SMALL BODY?
No. Scientologists consider children to be spiritual beings, like all people are but they need to be taken care of as children. L. Ron Hubbard has written quite a lot on the subject, including that “a child needs all of the love and affection it can possibly get” and that “a good stable adult with love and tolerance in his heart is about the best therapy a child can have.”

Children need respect, love, help, and education. They want to help others from a very early age and it is important that adults allow them to do so, within the realms of safety. A child has to know they have a place in life, that they are important and that their contributions are meaningful in a real way.
Education is an important part of this, as a child needs understanding of the workings of his family and society to be able to contribute to them in meaningful ways and in this he can be greatly assisted by his parents and other family members.

CAN CHILDREN PARTICIPATE IN SCIENTOLOGY? HOW?
Yes, many children do and there are no age restrictions as to who may participate in Scientology auditing or training. Scientology Churches conduct courses and study programs specifically designed for young people. Children below the age of majority must first obtain written consent from their parents or guardian to participate in Scientology services. Like adherents of other religions, Scientologists are very proud when their children join them in the practice of their religion.

WHAT IS SCIENTOLOGY?
Developed by L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology is a religion that offers a precise path leading to a complete and certain understanding of one’s true spiritual nature and one’s relationship to self, family, groups, Mankind, all life forms, the material universe, the spiritual universe and the Supreme Being.
Scientology addresses the spirit-not the body or mind-and believes that Man is far more than a product of his environment, or his genes.

Meet a Scientologist: Scientology Gave Chef Don Engle the Recipe for a Happy Life

November 22nd, 2010 by lbw

Scientology helped chef Don Engle increase his energy and improve his outlook in life.  His profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

Whether preparing a perfect sauce, dishing out 2,500 meals a day at the Detroit Athletic Club, or creating a fresh nuance to a classic pasta dish, chef Don Engle adds a pound of energy and a pinch of optimism to everything he does.

Working as a cook since he graduated from high school in Detroit, Engle, now 42, learned a word that opened his eyes to a career he loves.

“A new manager at the restaurant where I worked was a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America.  I had never even heard the word ‘culinary’ before,” says Engle.  “When I found out what it meant, I knew I wanted to be a chef.”

Accepted at the Culinary Institute in 1994, Engle graduated two years later.  As he started his internship, he decided to look into other ways to improve his life.

“I was always interested in the mind,” says Engle, “and I was looking through the self-help section of a local bookstore when I found Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.”

Engle read the book and, eager to put it to use, attended a Dianetics seminar and began helping another person with Dianetics procedures.

“It was amazing to see how much better he felt after just a few hours,” said Engle.

After a stint as executive chef for the U.S. Marine Corps Officers’ Club in Stuttgart, Germany, Engle returned home to Motor City.

“Scientology has helped me become more ethical. I gained a different viewpoint of myself and those around me and I get along better with others,” he says.  “It also gave me an energy boost.  I can accomplish so much more than I could before.”

Engle’s wife, Kalindi, whom he introduced to Scientology, is also featured on the Scientology Video Channel.

“The moment I saw her I knew she was the one,” Engle says.  “We use what we have learned in Scientology to make our marriage work.  No matter what happens, we have the technology to sort it out.”

Both Engles recently completed the study of all the basic books and lectures of L. Ron Hubbard at the Church of Scientology of Detroit.

“This has given me the knowledge I need to tackle any situation in life,” says Engle. “I am happier than I have ever been, with a feeling of stability that is hard to describe.”

View the Don Engle video on www.Scientology.org.

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The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Omar Contreras Conquering the Sky for Human Rights

November 22nd, 2010 by lbw

With the belief that anything is possible, Omar Contreras, expeditionary pilot, human rights activist and Scientologist, persists despite the odds.  His profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos available on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

“Work,” to Scientologist Omar Contreras, is flying over the seven highest peaks of the Andes in support of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and to save the environment.

The expedition is called “The Conquest of the Andes.”

Contreras’ two sons, Omar, 25, and Andrew, 23, are co-producing the venture. Pilots themselves, they are caring for the logistics in Caracas and Merida City, Venezuela.  Two other team members, Carlos Ocanto and Luis Tato Rivas, parallel the route on the ground in an SUV. The expedition runs from October 2010 to December 2010.

The video footage and photographs will be used in a 10-episode documentary, to show the degradation of the glaciers over the last 30 years.

“The planet deserves better treatment from us,” says Contreras.  “If we don’t start to take care of it, we will not survive.”

Contreras is flying a new ultralight motorized glider called The Kuntur—the word for “condor” in Quechua, an indigenous language of South America. It has a 100-horsepower engine, carries seven hours worth of fuel, and is capable of a cruising speed of 103 mph.

Seeking spiritual answers his entire adult life, Contreras, 49, became a Scientologist in 2002 when he found a kindred spirit in the director of the Church of Scientology Mission of Isla Margarita, Venezuela.

“Scientology enabled me to understand my true potentials and I found a group that shares my spirit of adventure and belief in tackling the ‘impossible’,” says Contreras.

Studying the basic principles of Scientology has enabled him to clarify and focus on what is important to him: family, and improving his city, country, and the environment.

Committed to human rights, he is conducting his current expedition on behalf of Youth for Human Rights International in support of Article 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights—The Right to Move: “the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state,” and “the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.”

“My message is that America is a single land.  The boundaries are all artificial—invisible from the air.”

The book Flying America, a TV series, and the film Flying South, which won first place in the documentary category in the 2005 Festival del Cine del Yelmo in Spain, were inspired by his 10-month, 36,000-km solo expedition to 182 cities in 21 countries from New York to La Patagonia, Argentina, “to unite America through flight.”

To create a better life for all South Americans he has also taken on the promotion of The Way to Happiness, a nonreligious moral code based entirely on common sense, where he works with Mr. Roberto León Parilli, president of Venezuela-based National Association of Users and Consumers and Colombian comedian Andres Lopez.

Contreras philosophy is simple—he believes in the ethic of hard work, persistence and never giving up.

“I believe we can change the world,” he says.

View the Omar Contreras video at www.Scientology.org

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The popular “Meet a Scientologist profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 150 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Inglewood, California Gives Scientology Church the Green Light

November 21st, 2010 by lbw

INGLEWOOD — Members and supporters of the Church of Scientology celebrated Tuesday night after the city council voted 4-0 to overturn a planning commission decision to deny them a permit to use a two-story property they own on Market Street as a church.

The 11-month battle over the special use permit (SUP), which has been the subject of several public hearings, came to a close when the council adopted a resolution overturning the Planning Commission denial and made appropriate findings for their decision.

In the public comment portion of the hearing, four residents spoke against the appeal while ten members of the audience, including Edie Reuveni and Eden Stein, the respective Los Angeles and Pasadena presidents of the Church of Scientology, spoke in favor.

Planning commission members considered the church’s application back in January, continued the matter in March and denied the request in April.

In a verbal background report to council, Christopher Jackson Sr., acting senior planner, explained that the commission cited four main reasons for rejecting the request: that the proposed church would negatively affect parking in the area; that the project would conflict with the city’s general plan to create a retail/entertainment hub downtown; that there was substantial public opposition; and incompatibility with the surrounding area.

However, in a letter of appeal, the church rejected all of the commission’s findings and cited federal law pertaining to the Religious Land Use and Institutional Persons Act that could not bar a religious building if the general requirements for a special use permit had been met.

Thus, at a subsequent June public hearing the council sought direction from City Attorney Cal Saunders and in July referred the matter back to the planning commission to re-consider the legal and parking implications.

However, in August the commission upheld their denial despite Saunders signaling his interpretation that federal law would trump local jurisdiction.

Thus, the church now has the go-ahead to convert its 45,000 square-foot basement commercial building located at 315 South Market Steet, a property it purchased two years ago — outbidding the city’s redevelopment agency — for about $5 million.

The site, a former retail jewelry store, had been empty for at least 12 years.

According to applicant’s original proposal, the new space will feature a chapel/multi-purpose room, a display area, seminar rooms, course rooms, a 2,424 square-foot book store, exercise/sauna rooms and related offices.

The 1,855 square-foot chapel is scheduled to be used from 9 a.m-11 a.m. on Sundays and the remaining 28,774 square-feet of usable floor area from 11 a.m.-10 p.m. on Sundays, and 9 a.m.- 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

During the Sunday gathering times, the counseling rooms will remained closed and the church indicated that it will employ two shifts of employees with a total 37 full and part-time staff members.

“I can’t believe we’ve spent nearly a year on this,” said Councilwoman Judy Dunlap, who introduced a motion to direct staff to prepare paperwork in overturning the commission denial.

“The zoning is appropriate and it is not in conflict with the general plan. The church clearly owns the property and I think they will be wonderful neighbors, bringing people into downtown. I believe that you’ll see the blight that so many people talk about begin to change and that area will start to flourish.”

Reuveni, speaking just after the decision, agreed.

“I think it’s terriific because I think it’s really going to add something to the community,” she told The Wave.

“We have so many outreach programs and they’re free of charge and they help and they’re successful. I work with many clergy and most of them are using our anti-drug program. That is the one most needed and wanted in Los Angeles so I’m looking forward to working with Inglewood.”

Photo: An artist impression of the Scientology building on Market Street. Credit: Courtesy photo

Article by Olu Alemoru, staff writer of The Wave

Artlightenment Shines at the Church of Scientology Nashville

November 21st, 2010 by lbw

Saturday, 20 November 2010–Robyn Morshead has been painting since she was little. Her growing love of not only art, but also the artists themselves, brought her to create an art show with a twist: fund the arts by promoting the artist. Now, for the second year in a row, she’s done it again and pulled together an awe-inspiring art show replete with art from legends like Michael McBride, James Threalkill and Juliana Ericson. The show: Artlightenment.

“If you elevate the artist, you elevate the culture—that is what this art show is about,” says Morshead, “it’s also about artists inspiring other artists and helping the artist to do better in his career.”

The show featured a workshop delivered by local artist Michael McBride. He was very impressed by the art show and what it did for the artists attending—“I can see a positive change in them from this,” he said. Morshead was very impressed by McBride’s workshop, “he is probably the best artist we could have gotten,” she continued, “this is giving people the opportunity to hear from experienced artists who are mentoring them and helping them… no one else does this.”

Artlightenment was held in the historic Fall School Building, which has now been beautifully renovated by the Church of Scientology. “Artlightenment is about the artist and the Church of Scientology is about helping artists overcome their individual barriers so they do better in their career,” said Morshead, “we couldn’t have picked a better location.”

“The whole show was elegant and classy; that’s what people really noticed—it wasn’t just thrown together with artwork hanging from chicken wire,” Morshead continued, “we had many well-known artists featured… and their work was presented very professionally and looked great.”

The Artlightenment artist showcase takes place annually in November at the Church of Scientology, 1130 8th Avenue South. For more information, visit www.artlightenment.com.

What is Silent Birth?

November 19th, 2010 by lbw

About.com printed an article on Silent Birth.  The text of the article follows:

Question: What is Silent Birth?

Answer: Silent birth is a belief in Scientology that no one should speak to the mother during birth. According to founder, L. Ron Hubbard, “Everyone must learn to say nothing within the expectant mother’s hearing during labor and delivery. Particularly during birth, absolute silence must be maintained and the more gentle the delivery, the better.”

However, it is not true that the mother must be silent during birth. She is allowed to make noise, moan—do whatever she needs to feel comfortable, without the use of words. The goal here is to reduce extraneous talking and noise in the room, the coached pushing and the talk that may not be related to the birth. Though this would also include encouraging words from your support team. The labor support should be conveyed in non-verbal ways like massage, gestures, and touch.

Scientology believes that words uttered in these special times are the cause of later nightmares, fear and upset.

Silent birth does not say how a birth should proceed. It does not preclude an epidural, c-section or other medical management, though many choose to give birth in other settings such as home or birth centers births.

Famous Silent Birth Couples:
Kelly Travolta & John Travolta; Katie Holmes & Tom Cruise

By , About.com Guide

Wade Henry—Juggler Extraordinaire Delights and Uplifts the Crowd

November 19th, 2010 by lbw

Scientologist Wade Henry’s jovial nature and love of people inspired his unique career. His profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

Wade Henry may look like an ordinary guy, but appearances can be deceiving. True, he’s up early for a quick bite to eat and off to work like the rest of us. But “work” is juggling chain saws or eating fire while riding a 12-foot unicycle.

In his “Meet a Scientologist” video at www.Scientology.org, Henry demonstrates some of the tools of his trade.

Fresh out of college with a business degree in 1995, Henry, now 38, decided to tour the world before settling down. He certainly toured, but chances are he’ll never settle down.

Halfway around the planet from his native Toronto when he ran out of money in Sydney, Australia, he created an act he could perform on the streets for tips. But natural entertainer that he is, he enjoyed the “work” so much, he has made it his lifelong career.

It was also in Sydney that Henry found Scientology, picking up and reading a copy of Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health.

“I had questions about our spiritual nature,” says Henry. “Reading books by L. Ron Hubbard, it was clear he not only had answers but also a practical technology that works.”

Returning home to Toronto, Henry continued with his Scientology studies. At the Church of Scientology of Toronto, he met and married wife Helen, a single mother of five, and instantly became the patriarch of a large and happy family that has grown to include a son-in-law and two grandchildren.

Now living in Clearwater, Florida, the couple manage his business, The Wade Henry Show. They have used administrative technology developed by L. Ron Hubbard to evolve it from street entertainment to a thriving career with Henry performing nearly 600 shows a year, mostly at festivals and fairs with the occasional corporate event.

“As a performer, Scientology has helped me communicate and develop rapport with my audiences,” Henry says.

It has also helped him concentrate.

“I cannot be juggling a chain saw in front of hundreds of people and have my mind wandering into problems that I have back at home or things that happened last week,” he says. “I need to be in the here and now and Scientology has helped me do that.”

Henry loves entertaining, and the best part of it is the people.

“What I like about being a performing artist is going into communities and uplifting people,” Henry says. “I get them away from the television sets and extricated from the virtual world and I deliver shows that bring them up and make them feel more alive.”

And being alive is what it’s all about.

“Being a Scientologist is an adventure,” says Henry, “and I’m an adventurer. So I love being a Scientologist.”

Watch the Wade Henry video on www.Scientology.org.

###

The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Photographer Conquers Her Fears and Achieves her Goals

November 18th, 2010 by lbw

Forced to avoid anything that might trigger panic, Nathalie Pressac was cut off from the simplest pleasures in life. By using the technology of Dianetics and Scientology she freed herself from these limitations and has never looked back. Her profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

Creative and smart, photographer Nathalie Pressac of Paris, France, should have had it made, but secretly she was wracked by fears and insecurity. There was little pleasure in her life and the door to success was slammed shut.

“I was beset by problems,” Pressac says. “I couldn’t take a bus or a metro without panic setting in. Any time I had to make an important decision the anxiety was overwhelming. And I couldn’t understand why I felt the way I did. I was searching, searching, searching for an answer.”

Introduced to Scientology and Dianetics by her husband, it truly changed her life.

“The results were immediate,” she says. “Through the application of Dianetics procedures I freed myself from the devastating loss of someone very dear to me, which I realized had triggered many of the difficulties I was experiencing. The relief was intense. I was amazed how good I felt.”

Pressac was able to open her own photography business. Her attitude in life changed completely.

“I am married to a wonderful man and my daughter is a joy to me. I wake up happy. I use what I have learned in Scientology every day,” she says. “I have been a photographer for 16 years and it is an extraordinary profession that requires creativity and communication. The knowledge I have gained from Scientology helps me bring something special to my work.”

Pressac, 44, loves seeing people do well—clients, family, and friends. And it works the other way too.

“One day, a friend told me something that meant a lot to me,” says Pressac. “She said, ‘I have known you before and since Scientology, and I like the person you have become.’”

View the Nathalie Pressac video at www.Scientology.org.

###

The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Italian Executive Makes a Success of Living

November 18th, 2010 by lbw

Directing an international network of translators, Daniela Fava uses what she learned in Scientology to stay calm, confident and in control. Her profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

When others get rattled, Daniela Fava keeps her cool.

A successful executive, Fava created and manages an international translations company headquartered in Reggio Emilia, Italy, with offices in Milano, Lugano and Hamburg. Her staff of 20 oversees more than 1,500 freelance translators around the world. Fava uses Scientology principles and administrative technology developed by L. Ron Hubbard to keep her business thriving.

While still in college, Fava read Scientology: The Fundamentals of Thought.

“This book was tremendously important to me,” says Fava. “It helped me believe in myself and use my abilities to achieve my dreams.”

Although never particularly troubled by problems, Fava had been searching for a way to help others, and through the book she learned technology that does exactly that. She credits Scientology as the key component in her success in business, personal life and raising a family.

“My daughter is the joy of my life,” says Fava, 47. “With the communication skills I learned in Scientology I can make it safe for her to talk to me, no matter what she has to say. I rarely have to give her advice. By respecting her opinions and listening to her, she usually solves her problems herself.”

An optimist, Fava never gives up on her dreams.

“I believe success depends on personal strength and moral integrity,” she says. “When you have that, you can create a better life, not only for yourself but for those you love.”

See Daniela’s video on www.scientology.org.

###

The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Churlya Wurfel Defies Classification, but Everything She Touches Thrives

November 17th, 2010 by lbw

A true citizen of the world, fashionista Churlya Wurfel—born and raised in a Chinese family in Indonesia, married to a German and living in Australia—reaches out to help countries throughout the Pacific Rim.

There is more to Churlya Wurfel than exquisite apparel and glamorous soirées.

True, she owns the Villoni Night Fashion Boutique and is famous for showcasing her new line of eveningwear on the trendiest runways Down Under. And the magnificent gowns on the Miss World Australia contestants often sport her label.

But aid workers and disaster victims in Indonesia, Thailand, Papua New Guinea and the Philippines know her too—as the petite woman in the bright yellow Scientology Volunteer Ministers T-shirt, helping in the wake of floods, tsunamis and typhoons.

And Wurfel was awarded the coveted Freedom Medal of the International Association of Scientologists for training the Red Cross of her native Indonesia in Scientology disaster response technology.

Although her husband became a Scientologist several years earlier, it was not until a personal calamity in 1983 that Wurfel herself embraced the religion.

“My three-year-old daughter was in Indonesia visiting her grandmother when we got the kind of phone call every mother dreads,” says Wurfel. “My child was in a hospital 1,700 miles away, dying of pneumonia—she had stopped breathing on her own.”

The Wurfels took the next flight to Java and her husband began giving their daughter Scientology assists—techniques developed by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard that address the mental and spiritual component in illness and injuries.

“Within a few hours of his beginning these assists, her temperature dropped to normal,” Wurfel says.

The next day their daughter was able to stand and walk. The Wurfels brought the toddler home and within a week the little girl had recovered completely.

“Seeing firsthand the power of this technology, I decided to see if it could help me too,” says the mother of three and grandmother of two.

And indeed there was something she suffered from herself—the loss of her grandmother when Wurfel was just a child. From that point forward she was never really a happy person.

“I addressed my grandmother’s death in a Dianetics counseling session. It completely changed my life,” says Wurfel.

That was 27 years ago, and Wurfel, now 56, has studied and used Scientology ever since. She has raised three children, built her boutique into one of the most elegant and prominent in the country, and helped thousands recover from trauma in disaster zones. And she now also serves as a staff member at the Church of Scientology of Sydney.

“I use Scientology in every aspect of my life,” she says. “I have become a better mother, a better wife and a better executive—in short, a better person.”

View the Churlya Wurfel video at www.Scientology.org.

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The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Kenneth W. Thomas: Nurse and Human Rights Activist

November 17th, 2010 by lbw

Dedicated to helping, Kenneth W. Thomas is a nurse, a Scientology auditor (spiritual counselor) and advocate for the rights of children and the elderly. His profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos available on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

A registered nurse since 1977, Scientologist Kenneth W. Thomas puts people first.

For the past three decades, this Clearwater, Florida, native has worked in everything from emergency rooms and psychiatric wards to intensive care, burn units, dialysis and nursing homes.

His decision to enter nursing was a very personal one. Thomas’s grandmother became very ill with complications from diabetes, and his frustration at not being able to care for her crystallized his purpose and career choice.

What he encountered in his training and hospital work laid bare for him the human condition. Once he learned how to care for the physical needs of patients, he began another search—to understand the spiritual.

When he read Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health he realized he had found what he was looking for.

“I finally learned how the mind works,” says Thomas. “I could understand my patients and what prompted them to feel and act as they did, and I understood myself.”

He has continued his studies of Scientology for the past 23 years, becoming a Scientology auditor—one who is trained to apply Scientology spiritual counseling to others, from the Latin audire, to listen.

“The communication skills I learned from training as an auditor have enabled me to draw patients out,” says Thomas, 55. “I find that when they can discuss their upsets and problems they usually feel relief, and sometimes that’s the turning point in their treatment.”

Thomas tells of a time his knowledge of Scientology assists helped save the life of a child. Assists are procedures developed by Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard that address the spiritual and emotional component in trauma, illness and injury.

“A three-year-old girl in a coma in intensive care was not responding to treatment,” says Thomas. “One of her family members is a Scientologist and asked if I could help.”

All the standard medical remedies had been performed by this point, so Thomas administered an assist. By the time he finished, the little girl opened her eyes. From that point on she continued to recover and was soon discharged from the hospital.

A proud grandfather of four, his love of children led Thomas to become an active member of the Tampa Bay Chapter of CCHR—Citizens Commission on Human Rights. He has co-authored a book, Side Effects, founded Nurses for Human Rights, which fights to eradicate the overmedication of children, and is featured in the award-winning CCHR documentary The Marketing of Madness: Are We All Insane?

View the Kenneth W. Thomas video at www.Scientology.org.

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The popular Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.

Italian Artist Imbues his Work with Magic

November 17th, 2010 by lbw

 

The paintings of Franco Farina span the real and the supernatural. Their otherworldly aesthetic evokes a universe where anything could happen. Farina’s profile is one of 200 “Meet a Scientologist” videos on the Scientology website at www.Scientology.org.

talian painter Franco Farina believes in dreams—those he depicts in his paintings, and those he makes come true.

“In this society,” says the 53-year-old Lombardy-based artist, “nobody unrolls the red carpet in front of you and says ‘We are here at your service to realize your dreams.’ It takes courage and a positive attitude to accomplish your goals, but it also takes an understanding of life.”

Farina credits Scientology with giving him the tools to translate his vision into reality.

A chance encounter at a restaurant in Pordenone with a stranger who became a lifelong friend led Farina to the Church of Scientology of Milan and a book by L. Ron Hubbard, Self Analysis.

“Using the procedures in this book I became more cheerful—my outlook in life improved and I felt more alive,” he says.

At the time, Farina was serving in the Italian army. He was surprised to find that as he himself changed, the people around him seemed to transform—even his military superiors.

“My commanding officer was no longer ‘The Captain!,’ he actually became a friend.”

Once out of the army and pursuing his career, Scientology continued to help him, this time giving him practical tools to translate his ideas into reality.

Artists commonly complain that they would rather stay in the studio and leave the business end to others. They are often stymied when it comes to promoting themselves and their work. This was yet another way Scientology helped Farina. The practical communication skills he learned freed him of any reluctance to make his work known, and he also availed himself of the know-how Scientology Founder L. Ron Hubbard developed on the subject of art.

“Applying this data allowed me to improve the quality of communication in my work,” says Farina.

As an artist, Farina believes it is important to keep in mind that one’s work has broad effects.

“It is not just about painting a canvas or writing a book or poem. Each work is a communication. Who knows how far it will reach or for how long? Being an artist carries with it a responsibility for the effects your work will have on the culture. And I believe that effect should be positive.”

View the Franco Farina video on www.Scientology.org.

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The popular “Meet a Scientologist” profiles on the Church of Scientology International Video Channel at Scientology.org now total 200 broadcast-quality documentary videos featuring Scientologists from diverse locations and walks of life. The personal stories are told by Scientologists who are educators, teenagers, skydivers, a golf instructor, a hip-hop dancer, IT manager, stunt pilot, mothers, fathers, dentists, photographers, actors, musicians, fashion designers, engineers, students, business owners and more.

A digital pioneer and leader in the online religious community, in April 2008 the Church of Scientology became the first major religion to launch its own official YouTube Video Channel, which has now been viewed by millions of visitors.